Prostate Cancer Survivors

 

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This forum is for the discussion of anything to do with Prostate Cancer.
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Re: A Friend of Mine

It is interesting to see how the wheel has turned on the subject of secondary tumours - especially bladder cancers - after radiation therapy. For many years men were told that apart from the immediately apprent 'collateral damage' that might arise from poorly aimed or focussed beams, there was simply no evidence of any long term negative consequences.

Of course the term 'no evidence' can mean in scientific terms that there is no evidence because we haven't looked for it. And it became apprent as time went by and more and more men communicated with each other on the Internet that there mwas indeed 'evidence. This was dismissied of course as anecdotal and of little value, but in the end, studies were done and - Hey! there were signifcant numbers of men who suffered negative consequences.

There is no doubt in my mind that isolation of the past, where any man who had a negative consequence to any kind of therapy was told that his case was unusual, has gone forever. That is why I believe it is so important for ALL of us prostate cancer men to share our stories - the good and the bad - and update them. That way men who come behind us will gain a far better understanding of some of the aspects of diagnosis and treatment of which they may be unaware.

If any of you reading this haven't told your story - come along and JOIN US

All the best
Terry in Australia

Re: A Friend of Mine

I asked the head of my HMO Uro Dept if they had taken the time to analyse the data in their records with respect to cases like mine. The response was "That is a very good question."
There is a large amount of data in my HMO records.
For most of the 5-6 years of my experience, I was under the impression that mine was an unusual case. It has always been on my mind that how come in such a large organization, my friend & I living 40 miles apart had such similar problems, treated by the same doctor. As Terry & others have pointed out, these cases are not unusual and may be closer to the norm than our doc's are willing to admit.
Joe

Re: A Friend of Mine

Joe,
"That is a very good question" has a reassuring sound, but doesn't appear to answer the question you asked. I hope your question results in someone actually going through the historical record and coming up with some constructive information.

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