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Re: another reason to go fishing

Aloha,
I like the take/tone of this review about fish diets

http://prostatecancerinfolink.net/2010/10/08/theres-a-limit-to-the-benefits-of-high-fish-diets/

This site does a very good job reading and condensing current articles on PC.
Joe

Re: another reason to go fishing

Thanks for the good link, Warwick. It makes it clear that fish consumption has no apparent value towards avoiding prostate cancer, yet has much value reducing the mortality therefrom.

I think it is unfortunate that common discourse always seems to speak of things that are cancer fighting and things that are cancer causing. Without any further distinction.

In that regard here is a clip from the Johns Hopkins health alert that I regularly get via email.

The development of cancer is broadly viewed as a two-step process. The first step is initiation, when the cell is exposed to substances (such as a chemical), agents (such as a virus), or forces (such as radiation) that cause an alteration (mutation) in the genetic machinery of the cell. The second step is promotion, in which other chemicals, hormones, or diet and lifestyle patterns stimulate the growth and reproduction of the abnormal cell. A promoter does not set the process in motion, but it creates an environment favorable for the runaway growth that causes a cancerous tumor to form and progress.

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