American Top 40/Top 20 Message Board

Discuss AT40/20 and Chart information with fellow fans!

American Top 40/Top 20 Message Board
Start a New Topic 
Author
Comment
billboard changes 1991/1992

I hate to sound like a sourpuss to some but i really think the billboard changes back in 91/92 was the worst thing to happen to at40 (as well as casey kasem leaving a few yrs before)when i look at some of these billboard record books it seems like so many songs from 92' on spent not weeks but months at #1 it is ridiculous and then some of these songs spent close to a year in the top40!!! Great records were shattered by songs that i wouldnt even consider classics!!! i can remember when songs spent an average of 1 to 2 weeks at #1 then you get a great song that mightve spent 4 or 5 weeks there, and of course then you had the all time greats that spent 8weeks or more(bette davis eyes, endless love, physical, etc) it was really something and was very enjoyable to track the countdowns then. any thoughts?

Re: billboard changes 1991/1992


I agree 100%. I also did not like it in 1994 when Casey's top 40 changed its format and songs started staying around longer. By 1995 there were songs on the countdown for 40 weeks. It really took something away from pop music.

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

Replying to:

I hate to sound like a sourpuss to some but i really think the billboard changes back in 91/92 was the worst thing to happen to at40 (as well as casey kasem leaving a few yrs before)when i look at some of these billboard record books it seems like so many songs from 92' on spent not weeks but months at #1 it is ridiculous and then some of these songs spent close to a year in the top40!!! Great records were shattered by songs that i wouldnt even consider classics!!! i can remember when songs spent an average of 1 to 2 weeks at #1 then you get a great song that mightve spent 4 or 5 weeks there, and of course then you had the all time greats that spent 8weeks or more(bette davis eyes, endless love, physical, etc) it was really something and was very enjoyable to track the countdowns then. any thoughts?

Re: Re: billboard changes 1991/1992


Casey's Top 40 did not change format. That was done by R&R. They began using monitored airplay rather than station playlists and, as a result, songs, which many radio stations dropped from their playlists very soon after they peaked (even though they were still regularly played) stayed on for longer than they did via the old system. This was alleviated in June, 1996 when R&R installed a rule regarding a song's chart duration. This has varied over the years, but right now, it states that songs that have been on for over 20 weeks are automatically dropped from the survey once they drop below number 20. This will explain how certain songs fall slowly and suddenly disappear from number 19 or 18. The chart used by AT40 is a Top 50 chart in the R&R magazine, so the songs' 20 weeks usually aren't all in the Top 40, which is why songs disappear like this after only 17 or 18 weeks on AT40.

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

Replying to:


I agree 100%. I also did not like it in 1994 when Casey's top 40 changed its format and songs started staying around longer. By 1995 there were songs on the countdown for 40 weeks. It really took something away from pop music.

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

Replying to:

I hate to sound like a sourpuss to some but i really think the billboard changes back in 91/92 was the worst thing to happen to at40 (as well as casey kasem leaving a few yrs before)when i look at some of these billboard record books it seems like so many songs from 92' on spent not weeks but months at #1 it is ridiculous and then some of these songs spent close to a year in the top40!!! Great records were shattered by songs that i wouldnt even consider classics!!! i can remember when songs spent an average of 1 to 2 weeks at #1 then you get a great song that mightve spent 4 or 5 weeks there, and of course then you had the all time greats that spent 8weeks or more(bette davis eyes, endless love, physical, etc) it was really something and was very enjoyable to track the countdowns then. any thoughts?

Re: billboard changes 1991/1992


Radio and Records to me basiclly is a *trade* publication like Billboard was intended to be. I personally like R&R better because it gives a more in deph information on what's new and breaking in music. Billboard has a more or less what's selling as opposed to what people are listening to and how are they are responding. I am not "mad" at Billboard, I think what has been forgotten often times was that they were the first to come up with a much more accurate chart methology and POS approach. R&R actually followed that same idea in 1994 as opposed to 1991. I thank God that we have R&R, nowadays Billboard's methodology is plain old out-of-date.



The Billboard Hot 100 chart has problems. I mean, is hip-hop music really that popular? I'd love to hear a station that played top forty music, but with that much country/heavy rap!

--- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---

Replying to:

I hate to sound like a sourpuss to some but i really think the billboard changes back in 91/92 was the worst thing to happen to at40 (as well as casey kasem leaving a few yrs before)when i look at some of these billboard record books it seems like so many songs from 92' on spent not weeks but months at #1 it is ridiculous and then some of these songs spent close to a year in the top40!!! Great records were shattered by songs that i wouldnt even consider classics!!! i can remember when songs spent an average of 1 to 2 weeks at #1 then you get a great song that mightve spent 4 or 5 weeks there, and of course then you had the all time greats that spent 8weeks or more(bette davis eyes, endless love, physical, etc) it was really something and was very enjoyable to track the countdowns then. any thoughts?

Re: billboard changes 1991/1992

There are really two issues to be addressed: AT40's choice of charts and Billboard's methods of compiling them.

When AT40 switched from the Hot 100 to the airplay chart in November 1991, I didn't like it either. First, the Hot 100 is THE authoritative chart. Second, part of what makes it so is the fact that it is the only one that uses sales at all.

Between 1991 and 1998, Billboard began expanding its radio base to include all radio stations. (They also went from radio stations' reports to monitored airplay, and they made a similar change on the sales.) As a result, the airplay that is reflected in the present-day Hot 100 is for all radio stations. To put it another way, a song gets the same position on the chart whether it's heard by 50 million people on pop stations and another 50 million on R&B stations, 100 million R&B and no top 40, or 100 million people on top 40 stations and none on R&B. (I've simplified this greatly, because there are so many kinds of stations.)

So, yes, R&B really is as popular as the charts indicate, but the difference is that the charts didn't always reflect it.

Re: billboard changes 1991/1992

I remember these changes, too. I believe it had to do with Billboard beginning to use Broadcast Data Systems (BDS) and Soundscan to compile their chart data. I didn't like it, either, but I chalked it up (my dislike of it, that is) to the fact that I was getting older. It was 11-30-91, the weekend of my 28th birthday, when Billboard converted over to Soundscan data, and top 40 is, of course, primarily a teenager's format. I am 42, now, and I had no use for grunge, which lasted for about 15 minutes in the early '90s. My opposition to grunge reminds me of my mother's negative reaction to the Beatles. (She was 25 when they hit it big in '64.)

When top 40 began to become irrelevant to me (probably sometime in the '80s), I began to listen to adult contemporary radio. That seemed to help somewhat. (I knew I was beginning to get too old for top 40 radio when Quiet Riot came out with "Cum On Feel the Noize." I was not quite 20 at the time. Certainly, there were top 40 songs prior to that that I didn't like, but with heavy metal, it just seemed a little different. I remember my sister (five years younger than me) used to try to **** me off by playing Quiet Riot--I wonder if she even still has that cassette!) I listen to a lot of oldies and "retro" radio programs now. The radio station on which I used to listen to AT 40 growing up is now an oldies station, and I can listen to them on the internet, which I am doing even as I type this.

But at least I didn't switch to listening to COUNTRY music like my sister did when she outgrew top 40. I think she listens to a lot of '80s now.

Re: billboard changes 1991/1992

Much of the reason for the change in charts was due to Radio stations dropping AT40 due to the popularity of Rap and Heavy Metal. By 1991, Rap and Heavy Metal had reached high positions on the Billboard Hot 100 and enough listeners had abandoned Top 40 radio for Country and AC as a result. To keep AT40 going, its staff decided to drop the Hot 100 and use Billboard's Radio Monitor, on which rap songs charted much lower. Still this was not enough and in 1993 AT40 began using the Mainstream Top 40 chart which, to my best knowledge only had 2 or 3 rap songs for the entire year of 1993 (Whoomp, which peaked at #38 and Rump Shaker). AT40 used this chart until the show went off in January 1995.

John

Re: billboard changes 1991/1992

I fully agree those changes in 1991 did not do much good for the music industry and chart lovers like me. I also doubt Billboard Hot 100 truly reflects what's hot. Some years ago it seemed to me like another R'n'B chart - sometimes having only hip-hop/rap in the top ten. Everyone who's happy with that chart should look back 20 years and see those BB charts, it was not only about having a lot of different genres but there was a lot of action on that chart. For one decade the Hot 100's top ten usually had only one new song, the others were often just mere holders - not to mention the number one. I wonder why was that good for the music industry? As for the Hot 100 airplay chart, the situation today is still tragic - just for comparison, some months ago Avril Lavigne's huge hit,"When you're gone", peaked at No. 37 there while reaching No. 6 on R & R. That reveals everything...